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How you Lose Customers with the Login Page

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The login option is a precious tool for marketers, as through login users are identified and their activity on the site is monitored.
But what happens when this login is aggressively introduced in the early stages of the user's journey to the site?

Numerous usability tests have shown that users are very annoyed by logging pages.
It is necessary to differentiate the login pages that request the consumer's data before accessing the content of the login pages that are required to complete a command, action on a site or a payment.

Login pages have a cost in terms of interacting with users when they need to remember their login (if they have an account) or take the time to register.
The effort to create a new account is justified and encouraged by communicating benefits such as:

  • Full client panel
  • Quick login
  • Place shortcut
  • History orders
  • Download invoices
  • Download Warranty
Initial login pages, such as those that restrict access, should only be used if the user gains from logging, or if the use of applications is dependent on this type of login.
One such example is social networks, where access is restricted by login.

Logging pages are a headache for sites that people visit rarely. Moreover, logging into many sites becomes frustrating for users and because they always have to remember the login data.

This issue can be resolved by giving users the option to login with Facebook / Google / Yahoo / Linkedin. This does not require a new user and password for each site: a single login account for multiple sites.

A site argument is in favor of creating an account in the initial stage of access is: "But it's only for the first time, the next time we keep logged in users!" This argument can be successful if the benefits provided after logging is of great interest to the user, but the user must be well informed of these benefits, possibly even testing them in a minimal version.

Furthermore, it must be borne in mind that the user can use several devices from which they access the site: desktop PC, phone, tablet, which means an additional login on each device.

Login is a cost to the customer, and if the utility of logging is not anticipated to be higher than the cost, the user will quit.

Sites also appeal to aggressive techniques to increase the login rate, such as when users are forced to log in to access the functionality.

Another way to persuade the user to log in is when we block access to functionality, but we also offer a reward with login (a voucher, a discount, a low priced promise).

As common sense, we recommend that you use the principle of reciprocity when using logging pages.

You always have to think about the benefit the user perceives: if there is even the slightest chance that the benefits will not be obvious, then you have to forget the log pages.

Logging in and logging on, or logging steps, for online stores, are part of a distinct discussion that deserves a more in-depth discussion in a future article.
 

CyRaw

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#2
This is very true. The user must be redeemed somewhat for entering some data, an email address, a password. First of all, there must be safety and secondly rapidity.
 

luispas

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#3
What an interesting topic, it's really amazing how this little things can affect the way people would like a internet page (in general terms). That's why the phrase that says: "sometimes less is more" it's so important to keep it in mind.
 
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