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What data is important to track in Analytics reports?

CyRaw

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#2
Your site should have traffic from a variety of sources. This is important to know especially if you have paid campaigns. There are three categories in which sources are distributed: direct visitors, visitors from organic search and referrals.
  • Direct visitors will be those who came to the site by typing in the browser the site's URL;
  • Visitors from organic search are those who arrive on the site after a search on search engines;
  • Referrals are the ones who visited your site from a different source such as social networks, a blog that wrote about you, etc.
All three sources are very important, but have different levels of conversion. That's why you should calculate how much each traffic source converts and then act on these numbers.

1. Conversions are from new visitors or from uniques?
It's vital to know this, because visitors who have been on your site will interact with you differently than those who visit your site for the first time. If you want to improve the experience for new visitors, you need to isolate the conversion rate of loyal clients or returning visitors.

Isolate these data, you will be able to find the source of new visitors, what they see first when they arrive on the site (what page or article) and what actions you can take to improve their initial visit.

2. Bounce rate
The bounce rate can be defined as the time spent by new visitors on the site until you leave without having any activity on your site. Which means no interaction, no viewing, no clicks. If you have a high rejection rate, it can be an indication of many things including irrelevant traffic sources, high charging times, unpleasant landing pages, or poorly organized pages.

Generally blogs will see that they have a high bounce rate. This is because visitors tend to read one article on the site and then move on.

3. Output pages
Often the conversion is not derived from the homepage. Often the completion of the order will be done on another page. This information is usually tracked within a built funnel. Follow on which page the customer has gone from the site to see at what stage of the buying process he has dropped it. When you find out, you can make some changes on that page.

In general, visitors are advised to not walk on too many pages until conversion, because they will get bored and leave. The process should be as simple as possible.

Once you realized that this information and data are important to track in Google Analytics, you will be able to track your progress much better and more efficiently. Your marketing strategies should be done by analyzing the data, and you will get better results.
 
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Sencuart

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#3
Your site should have traffic from a variety of sources. This is important to know especially if you have paid campaigns. There are three categories in which sources are distributed: direct visitors, visitors from organic search and referrals.
  • Direct visitors will be those who came to the site by typing in the browser the site's URL;
  • Visitors from organic search are those who arrive on the site after a search on search engines;
  • Referrals are the ones who visited your site from a different source such as social networks, a blog that wrote about you, etc.
All three sources are very important, but have different levels of conversion. That's why you should calculate how much each traffic source converts and then act on these numbers.

1. Conversions are from new visitors or from uniques?
It's vital to know this, because visitors who have been on your site will interact with you differently than those who visit your site for the first time. If you want to improve the experience for new visitors, you need to isolate the conversion rate of loyal clients or returning visitors.

Isolate these data, you will be able to find the source of new visitors, what they see first when they arrive on the site (what page or article) and what actions you can take to improve their initial visit.

2. Bounce rate
The bounce rate can be defined as the time spent by new visitors on the site until you leave without having any activity on your site. Which means no interaction, no viewing, no clicks. If you have a high rejection rate, it can be an indication of many things including irrelevant traffic sources, high charging times, unpleasant landing pages, or poorly organized pages.

Generally blogs will see that they have a high bounce rate. This is because visitors tend to read one article on the site and then move on.

3. Output pages
Often the conversion is not derived from the homepage. Often the completion of the order will be done on another page. This information is usually tracked within a built funnel. Follow on which page the customer has gone from the site to see at what stage of the buying process he has dropped it. When you find out, you can make some changes on that page.

In general, visitors are advised to not walk on too many pages until conversion, because they will get bored and leave. The process should be as simple as possible.
@CyRaw explained just about everything but forgot about the the session duration.

Average session duration
This information represents the average time (in hours, minutes, seconds) a visitor spends in a single session on your site. This time has a direct correlation with how relevant your site is to the user - the more relevant and interesting is it will spend more time accessing the information on the site. When interactions per visit are low, but the duration of the session is high, the user is interested in the information that is encountered and spends more time on the page.

If you have a long and interesting article, this does not mean a bad thing because the user has probably given you time to read it. But if that page is a landing page in an ad, too much time spent on it is a negative thing because landing pages must be created so that the user does not take too long to decide to act: buy , download something, send a message, etc.
 

CyRaw

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#4
@CyRaw explained just about everything but forgot about the the session duration.

Average session duration
This information represents the average time (in hours, minutes, seconds) a visitor spends in a single session on your site. This time has a direct correlation with how relevant your site is to the user - the more relevant and interesting is it will spend more time accessing the information on the site. When interactions per visit are low, but the duration of the session is high, the user is interested in the information that is encountered and spends more time on the page.

If you have a long and interesting article, this does not mean a bad thing because the user has probably given you time to read it. But if that page is a landing page in an ad, too much time spent on it is a negative thing because landing pages must be created so that the user does not take too long to decide to act: buy , download something, send a message, etc.
You are right, I forgot what was most important :)
 
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